LETS TALK ABOUT ART – HALF WAY – AMY celestina Ndione

Amy Célèstina Ndione, ‘In Time’, collage, sewing and acrylic on fine wired mesh, 40 x 40 cm, 2021.
Amy Célèstina Ndione, ‘In Time’, collage, sewing and acrylic painting on wire mesh, 40 x 50, 2021
Amy Célèstina Ndione, ‘In Time’, collage, sewing and acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40 cm, 2021.

Amy Célèstina Ndione (1988) graduated from the National School of Arts of Dakar. Upon graduation Ndione developed her research alongside the artists of L’ Atelier Kakatar led by Piniang. She lives and works in Dakar.

Amy Célèstina Ndione: “I’m working on a body of work in which I am interested in social, environmental, feminist, psychological subjects. I treat my subjects from different angles: sociological, semiotics and scientific. Human behavior remains a mystery to me and with it the question of its evolution.

I observe the world around me. From this observation I create an imaginary world to write my vision of the world. Using symbols and signs [arrow, hourglass, binary code, calendar…]. I tell stories that everyone could interpret. From hearing middle class people on public transport on Dakar’s buses and how they complain about how they are treated like sheep, I began to represent people with sheep’s heads in my work.

As a (human) being in a constantly changing universe, I became more interested in human evolution. And after reading Yuval Noah Harari’s book ‘Sapiens: A Brief History of Humanity’, aesthetics began to become less and less important to me and to create awareness much more. I mix painting with different materials such as wire mesh and paper to create a unique universe inspired by the reality that surrounds me.

The time that I often represent by an hourglass in my works is gaining more and more importance in my work. I think it is the key to happiness. I’ve always seen people caring about time while others let it pass without caring.

Time, linear or circular, has become today more than ever a currency of exchange. I would like people to take the time to reflect on their situation by lifting this veil that is habit and routine. Like sheep we just follow the masses. I use thread and sewing to wink at the woman with this practice which has long been considered a housewife’s pastime.

Amy Célèstina Ndione in her a studio in Dakar, Senegal.